Discussion:
Wired Readers' Brain-Enhancing Drug Regimens
(too old to reply)
chessucat
2008-04-24 16:15:14 UTC
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X-No-Archive: yes

If Wired.com readers are any indication, performance-enhancing drugs
are moving from the sports field into the office.

We're not talking steroids; we're talking brain steroids.

Surprisingly large numbers of people appear to be using brain-
enhancing drugs to work harder, longer and better. They're popping
pills normally prescribed for narcolepsy or attention-deficit disorder
to improve their performance at work and school.

"We aren't the teen clubbers popping uppers to get through a hard day
running a cash register after binge drinking," wrote a Ph.D. research
scientist who regularly takes a wakefulness drug called Provigil,
normally prescribed for narcolepsy. "We are responsible humans."

http://www.wired.com/medtech/drugs/news/2008/04/smart_drugs

I can't compete with this doping shit!:-(

<chessucat twitches>
Quiet Neighbor
2008-04-24 17:03:56 UTC
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X-No-Archive: yes
Post by chessucat
X-No-Archive: yes
If Wired.com readers are any indication, performance-enhancing drugs
are moving from the sports field into the office.
We're not talking steroids; we're talking brain steroids.
Surprisingly large numbers of people appear to be using brain-
enhancing drugs to work harder, longer and better. They're popping
pills normally prescribed for narcolepsy or attention-deficit disorder
to improve their performance at work and school.
"We aren't the teen clubbers popping uppers to get through a hard day
running a cash register after binge drinking," wrote a Ph.D. research
scientist who regularly takes a wakefulness drug called Provigil,
normally prescribed for narcolepsy. "We are responsible humans."
http://www.wired.com/medtech/drugs/news/2008/04/smart_drugs
I can't compete with this doping shit!:-(
<chessucat twitches>
I've been interested in nootropics for many years. However, I'm concerned
that some of them might exacerbate SZ/SZA.
Erik the Red
2008-04-24 19:59:41 UTC
Permalink
I read about Provigil in popular science a while back. The military
was really interested in it.
I'm not sure if it would help me as I have lack of motivation as well
as sedation.
Quiet Neighbor
2008-04-24 21:18:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erik the Red
I read about Provigil in popular science a while back. The military
was really interested in it.
I'm not sure if it would help me as I have lack of motivation as well
as sedation.
I'd be curious what happens, if you try it.

On Z, I would sleep 'til noon.
Erik the Red
2008-04-24 21:35:59 UTC
Permalink
Seroquel, Risperdal, and Zyprexa - all make me sleep alot. You're
lucky that you can do well on a little risperdal.
I've been talking with a doc about taking a cognitive med. It's in
phase II right now. Next week I take home a consent form to look over
and research. Sounds easy enough - the seroquel study I was in was
like pulling teeth. This one does blood tests and a 30 minute
computer test. Shouldn't be a big deal. I would take the med with my
current meds. 1 in 4 get placebo. I would rather wait until it's FDA
approved, but I'm desperate to increase my quality of life. It is
supposed to help with quitting smoking too.
Sounds to good to be true - doesn't it?
Huis Clos
2008-04-24 22:05:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erik the Red
Seroquel, Risperdal, and Zyprexa - all make me sleep alot. You're
lucky that you can do well on a little risperdal.
I've been talking with a doc about taking a cognitive med. It's in
phase II right now. Next week I take home a consent form to look over
and research. Sounds easy enough - the seroquel study I was in was
like pulling teeth. This one does blood tests and a 30 minute
computer test. Shouldn't be a big deal. I would take the med with my
current meds. 1 in 4 get placebo. I would rather wait until it's FDA
approved, but I'm desperate to increase my quality of life. It is
supposed to help with quitting smoking too.
Sounds to good to be true - doesn't it?
It probably is. Or maybe you'll get the placebo. =:-O
Quiet Neighbor
2008-04-25 17:01:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erik the Red
Seroquel, Risperdal, and Zyprexa - all make me sleep alot. You're
lucky that you can do well on a little risperdal.
I've been talking with a doc about taking a cognitive med. It's in
phase II right now. Next week I take home a consent form to look over
and research. Sounds easy enough - the seroquel study I was in was
like pulling teeth. This one does blood tests and a 30 minute
computer test. Shouldn't be a big deal. I would take the med with my
current meds. 1 in 4 get placebo. I would rather wait until it's FDA
approved, but I'm desperate to increase my quality of life. It is
supposed to help with quitting smoking too.
Sounds to good to be true - doesn't it?
As you are aware, I'm not comfortable with you being in drug studies.

I thought your Provigil idea sounded good.
Erik the Red
2008-04-25 20:40:55 UTC
Permalink
I know.
Perhaps I'm just trying to prove to myself that I'm doing all I can to
improve my life. Quitting smoking - losing weight - being motivated
to get things done.
Plus I'm bad at waiting.
I mean we schizers have to wait 3 years for a med that if approved may
or may not work anyway!
You see I'll be 34 this year - I'm wasting the prime years of my life
being overweight with no motivation.

I'm very conflicted about this study. It's the front of all my wishes
for a better life.
(PeteCresswell)
2008-04-25 23:25:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erik the Red
Perhaps I'm just trying to prove to myself that I'm doing all I can to
improve my life. Quitting smoking - losing weight - being motivated
to get things done.
Plus I'm bad at waiting.
I mean we schizers have to wait 3 years for a med that if approved may
or may not work anyway!
You see I'll be 34 this year - I'm wasting the prime years of my life
being overweight with no motivation.
Flip it around: you're only 34 years old and if the stuff you
take has some permanent deleterious effect on your mind you're
going to have to live with that for a very long time.

OTOH, another five years could buy you a degree of
certainty/safety.

Quitting smoking *and* losing weight? Yer a helluva man if you
can do both. Most people gain weight when they quit.

Do you have the time/surroundings to find some form of
semi-addictive exercise?

Something like PreCor's 100i and the right music or TV programs
can get you a solid hour of exercise with zero pain. If it were
possible, that would be my first move: get comfortable with some
sort of exercise routine where the pleasure outweighs the
pain..... and the second part of that sentence is, in my
experience, absolutely crucial in the long run.
--
PeteCresswell
Erik the Red
2008-04-26 02:07:12 UTC
Permalink
I'd be 150lbs if I didn't take something for my brain. I don't find
eating food all that entertaining off meds.
I just need a new drug - and I have to find patience with the FDA.
I am where I started, you see? Back in 98 I was put on zyprexa. This
is the best (and worse) med on the market for me.
The human genome has been mapped. Now where's my cure and my flying
car!
Patrick Meuser-Bianca
2008-06-19 02:33:25 UTC
Permalink
If you work for DARPA, I suppose that's the secret.

Patrick Ashley Meuser"-Bianca"
Cybeneticist
http://www.usag-ac.info
Post by chessucat
X-No-Archive: yes
If Wired.com readers are any indication, performance-enhancing drugs
are moving from the sports field into the office.
We're not talking steroids; we're talking brain steroids.
Surprisingly large numbers of people appear to be using brain-
enhancing drugs to work harder, longer and better. They're popping
pills normally prescribed for narcolepsy or attention-deficit disorder
to improve their performance at work and school.
"We aren't the teen clubbers popping uppers to get through a hard day
running a cash register after binge drinking," wrote a Ph.D. research
scientist who regularly takes a wakefulness drug called Provigil,
normally prescribed for narcolepsy. "We are responsible humans."
http://www.wired.com/medtech/drugs/news/2008/04/smart_drugs
I can't compete with this doping shit!:-(
<chessucat twitches>
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